Washington wants to cover up the offshoring of American jobs

by guest blogger Michele Nash-Hoff

Since NAFTA went into effect in 1994, the U. S. has generated the highest trade deficit in the world and the largest in the world's recorded history. If you add the annual trade deficit in goods as shown on the Census Bureau website, the  total is a staggering figure of -$10.347 trillion.

 

 

 

The United States now has a trade deficit with 88 countries according to data in the book, Buying Back America. Some deficits are small, but some are enormous. Our top six trading partners of Canada, China, Mexico, Japan, Germany, and South Korea represent 64% of our total trade deficit. In 2013, our total trade deficit in goods was $688.4 billion, of which China represented 46% at $318.4 billion. However, our 20-year total trade deficit with China since 1994 is a staggering -$3.287 trillion.

 

 

 

Now, the current Administration wants to cover up the evidence of the damage to our economy by changing the rules of how a manufacturer is defined instead of responding to the American public's demand to know where products are manufactured so they can have the freedom to choose whether or not to buy "Made in USA" products.   

 

 

 

On June 24, 2014, Robert E. Scott, Director of Trade and Manufacturing Policy Research for the Economic Policy Institute, conducted a webinar for the Coalition for a Prosperous America: "The Factoryless Goods Production Controversy (Foreign Goods Production) - How proposed government rule changes would classify foreign goods as U.S.-made."  

 

 

 

He explained that an Economic Policy Classification Committee (ECPC) formed by the Office of Management and Budget is proposing a Factoryless Goods Production (FGP) and Global Value Chain (GVC) rule to artificially inflate manufacturing production and reduce the trade deficit. This change would result in shrinking our trade deficit and growing our manufacturing output with the stroke of a pen, without adding any more real jobs or production.  

 

 

 

The ECPC was formed to make recommendations for revising the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS), created in 1997 as a unified Industrial classification system for the U.S., Mexico and Canada.  

 

 

 

Traditionally, all production chain tasks were performed in one factory, in multiple factories of one firm, or by subcontract suppliers to that firm, as is the case for companies like Northrop Grumman that makes Unmanned Aircraft Systems in San Diego.  

 

 

 

In the last 20 years, improvements in communications, technology and transportation, as well as global trade agreements and foreign investment in plants have allowed product design, development, and manufacturing to be performed in different locations, including offshore in China and other Asian countries.  

 

 

 

This has enabled a company to control production without directly performing any manufacturing process or transformation task in one of their facilities; e.g. Apple, Nike, AMD, and fabless semiconductor manufacturing. In fact, the top five semiconductor firms in 2013 were fabless companies: Qualcomm, Broadcom, AMD, Mediatek, and Nvidia. These companies focus on innovation, product development, marketing, and sales rather than manufacturing tasks.  

 

 

 

There are currently three types of establishment classifications:

 

 

 

Type of Establishment

Characteristics

 

Integrated Manufacturer (IM)

 

Performs all the tasks of the production

chain

Manufacturing Service Provider (MSP)

Performs transformation tasks but does

not perform production management

tasks (may purchase inputs)

 

Factoryless Goods Producer (FGP)

Does not perform transformation tasks

but performs all production management

tasks (may or may not own parts)

 

These current classifications require the statisticians to choose where to put the FGPs and how to count production. They now have the choice of classifying them as wholesalers, manufacturers, or split based on the location of the transforming company.  

 

 

 

Currently, Apple and Nike are classified as wholesalers since they do not perform any manufacturing transformation tasks in the U.S. This accurately reflects the fact that both Apple and Nike have offshored their manufacturing to China.

 

Under current policy, when a company like Apple ships component parts to China to be assembled in a Chinese factory (e.g. Foxconn) and then sends the product back to the U.S. to be sold here, the value of the imported iPhone minus the value of the exported parts counts as a net U.S. import of manufactured goods.

 

 

 

Under the ECPC proposal, Foxconn, now called a "manufacturing services provider," would not be described as having manufactured the iPhones but as having provided services to Apple.  

 

 

 

An additional concern is that the ECPC proposes to treat some goods exported by foreign factories as U.S. manufactured exports. For example, currently, when Apple ships iPhone parts to China to be assembled by Foxconn and then ships the finished product to another county, Apple's export of these parts to China counts as the only U.S. export.

 

 

 

But, the ECPC proposed rule would classify the engineering, marketing and profit to Apple as U.S. production. A fully assembled iPhone sale to another country, such as Japan or a European Union country, would count as a "U.S. manufactured goods export," less the cost of any imported parts.  

 

The justification for this is that while China manufactured and exported the iPhones, they count as U.S. manufactured exports because they were under the control of a U.S. brand. This would create an artificial increase in U.S. manufactured exports and cover up the real U.S. manufacturing trade deficit.

 

Thus, if a U.S. based company offshores manufacturing work, much of it would be classified as U.S. production. Further, imported products from foreign contract manufacturers hired by a U.S. company will no longer be a "goods import" but rather a "manufacturing services import." This means that products from Flextronics in Mexico, which makes components in Mexico for U.S. firms that are shipped to the U.S., would no longer be considered a "goods import" but a "services import."

 

 

 

In addition, the ECPC proposal would result in a miraculous overnight increase in the number of U.S. "manufacturing" jobs. White-collar employees in firms like Apple would be re-branded as "factoryless goods producers" and counted as "manufacturing" workers. The change would also create a false increase in manufacturing wages, as many of the new-to-be-counted "manufacturing" jobs would be designers, programmers and brand managers at "factoryless goods producers" like Apple. As a result, reported manufacturing output would jump, as revenues from firms like Apple would be lumped in with the output of actual U.S. manufacturers.

 

 

 

This proposal would deceptively shrink the size of the reported U.S. manufacturing trade deficit while artificially inflating the number of U.S. manufacturing jobs. It would obscure the erosion of U.S. manufacturing, undermining efforts to improve the trade and economic policies for our country.  

 

 

 

This proposal is fraudulent and would distort U.S. trade, labor, and gross domestic product statistics that show the need for a developing a manufacturing strategy in the U.S.  

 

The offshoring of U.S. manufacturing under years of bad trade policies should not be undone with a data trick.

 

 

 

The proposal from the Economic Classification Policy Committee (ECPC) to redefine U.S. manufacturing and trade statistics must be stopped. Only manufacturing performed within the U.S. should be considered U.S. goods production. If manufacturing occurs in another country, it simply is not U.S. production.

 

 

 

On May 22, 2014 the Office of Management & Budget solicited comments on these proposed revisions. You also can view the notice for this proposal in the  Federal Register. The comment period ends July 21, 2014. You may email your comments today to John.Burns.Murphy@census.gov to keep the "factoryless goods" proposal from becoming a reality. Or, to make taking action even easier, you can click here to customize and submit a pre-drafted comment provided by the Coalition for a Prosperous America.