Updates

03/18/11
By Kevin Bogardus, The Hill AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said he doesn’t believe the White House will move forward with the Colombia trade deal this year due to concerns about labor rights. Speaking Thursday at the Council on Foreign Relations, the union federation leader took aim at Colombia’s record of violence against union members and said the White House will not move the Colombia, Korea and Panama trade agreements together, as lawmakers have demanded.
03/18/11
By Bill Lambrecht St. Louis Post-Dispatch Two Missourians in Congress say they intend to pressure the Obama administration to do a better job of enforcing trade laws that would protect Missouri companies and industries elsewhere from unfair practices by Chinese competitors.
03/17/11
There were some interesting and damaging admissions yesterday at a House Energy & Commerce Committee hearing on the pending free trade agreements with Colombia and South Korea. The hearing, entitled “Made in America: Increasing Jobs through Exports and Trade” had Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade Francisco J. Sanchez on the hot seat along with a panel of business executives and advocates for corporate America.
03/17/11
By Doug Palmer, Fox4KC.com WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A group of President Barack Obama's fellow Democrats on Wednesday vowed to fight him on a proposed trade deal with South Korea the White House wants passed by July 1. "The war on the middle class continues. It's greatest battle of 2011 will be the Korea free trade agreement," said Representative Brad Sherman at an event with eight other House of Representatives Democrats.
03/16/11
By Brad Sherman Supporters of the proposed free-trade agreement between the United States and South Korea argue that we should approve the pact to improve our economy and to reward an ally in a troubled region for its strong security relationship with the U.S., and to solidify these strong security ties with a stronger trade relationship. Though there is no doubt South Korea is a close ally, we need to ensure that the agreement does not undermine U.S. security and economic interests by benefiting North Korea.
03/16/11
Ian Fletcher, courtesy of The Huffington Post How did America end up in its present trade pickle? NAFTA? No way. The WTO? I wish. To understand our present predicament, you need to go back much further than that. In retrospect, America's decisive wrong turn on trade was probably John F. Kennedy's Trade Expansion Act of 1962.
03/15/11
This week in Washington, House Republicans will be holding another round of hearings on the Colombia and Panama Free Trade Agreements as they continue to pressure the Obama administration to package these with the Korea FTA and send all three up to Capitol Hill for approval.
03/14/11
By Ian Fletcher, courtesy of The Market Oracle My job deprives me of the luxury of partisanship, as I have to reach out to both sides on the issue of free trade--a disastrous policy one can give impeccably liberal or conservative reasons to be against. So I can't offer any opinion of the Tea Party movement per se. But I can tell you that the way they're handling the issue of free trade reveals a lot about them.
03/14/11
From WKBN in Ohio At a White House meeting Friday of the President's Export Council, U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown revived his call to extend a Department of Labor program known as Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA). TAA is a package of training and re-employment services designed to help workers who have lost their jobs as a result of foreign trade develop the skills they need to find new jobs. Since mid-February, eligibility for the TAA program has been denied for service workers and for manufacturing workers who lost their jobs due to trade with countries with which the United States does not have a free trade agreement, including China.
03/11/11
By Ashley Lutz, Bloomberg When Vaughn Bullman moved to Drummer Avenue in 1961, thousands of people built cash registers at the NCR Corp. (NCR) in Dayton, Ohio, and assembled cars at a General Motors Co. plant in nearby Moraine. Now, 10 of Drummer Avenue’s 30 houses are empty; throughout Dayton, the city north of Cincinnati where the Wright brothers planned the first airplane, the proportion of vacant homes is one in five. NCR and General Motors are gone, and so are many middle-class wage earners.

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