Updates

03/11/11
“Beef – It’s what’s for dinner” is the tagline of a long-running ad campaign by the beef industry to encourage more domestic consumption. Beef is also the main course of a new trade pact between the U.S. and Korea and the politics behind this dispute are as juicy as some top tenderloin.
03/10/11
Courtesy of Agri-Pulse Communications ST. LOUIS, MO. March 8 – U.S. poultry and livestock farmers provide more than just meat, milk, eggs and other food. They also produce jobs, generate property tax revenues and contribute to household incomes. A new report by Promar International shows that poultry and livestock industries produced 1.8 million jobs, and contributed $252 billion in U.S. gross domestic production on an annual basis. Livestock and poultry also contributed $41 billion to U.S. household incomes, increasing income by $3 billion over the past 10 years, according to the study.
03/10/11
By Ian Swanson, The Hill Trade tensions between the White House and Republicans burst into the public on Wednesday as Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) threatened to hold up an agreement with South Korea. Hatch said President Obama’s highly touted deal with South Korea, which has won support from both parties, the business community and labor groups, will not win consideration from Republicans unless it is paired with more controversial deals with Colombia and Panama.
03/10/11
By Dava Castillo, Courtesy of AllVoices Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos on Tuesday requested the U.S. Congress to approve the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) signed in November 2006. The agreement would strengthened economic ties between the U.S. and Colombia by eliminating tariffs and other barriers to goods and services and expand trade.
03/10/11
Editorial from The Bennington Banner During every recession since 1980, the call has gone out to buy American products, rather than imported goods, as a way to chop down our chronic trade deficit and save American jobs. Guess what: That movement is back stronger than ever, and this time, it seems millions of consumers are finally taking the message seriously. That's a good thing.
03/09/11
The pundits and talking heads pontificating about the ruckus in Madison are missing a fundamental point. This standoff is not about Democrats and Republicans. The real fight is about jobs.
03/09/11
By Shannon Frazer, Kentucky Kernel Let’s get some things straight: Supporting a global economy, encouraging fair and free trade and outsourcing to provide employment opportunities to people abroad can all be good things. But there is a point when we as Americans have to realize the impact the government, corporations and even our own buying behaviors have on our domestic economy.
03/08/11
By Dustin Ensinger, Economy in Crisis In a sign of just how clueless some politicians are about America’s manufacturing crisis, former Republican presidential candidate and current Sen. John McCain claimed over the weekend that iPods and iPhones are made right here in America. McCain made the erroneous claim during an appearance on ABC’s This Week when the discussion turned to America’s dwindling manufacturing base, and its effect on the economy.
03/08/11
By Todd Tucker, Eyes on Trade Princeton economist Uwe Reinhardt had an interesting post on trade last week on the NYT website that will probably spark some debate. He writes: The economist’s case for free trade is cobbled together from the toolkit labeled normative economics, a branch of economic analysis that seeks to identify what is efficient and what is not and, thus, what is good policy and what is not — and, therefore, what should and should not be done.
03/08/11
By Devin Dwyer, ABC News State and local governments, which spend close to $2 trillion annually on goods and services, are increasingly trying to leverage their purchasing power to favor American businesses and create jobs. Twenty-one states had "Buy American" laws through 2009, according to the National Association of State Procurement Officials, and nearly every state has implemented preference statutes for buying from in-state producers, many added since the recession began.

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