Updates

02/16/11
The airliner is billions of dollars over budget and about three years late. Much of the blame belongs to the company's farming out work to suppliers around the nation and in foreign countries. The biggest mistake people make when talking about the outsourcing of U.S. jobs by U.S. companies is to treat it as a moral issue. Sure, it's immoral to abandon your loyal American workers in search of cheap labor overseas. But the real problem with outsourcing, if you don't think it through, is that it can wreck your business and cost you a bundle. Case in point: Boeing Co. and its 787 Dreamliner.
02/16/11
SPOONS and forks, the metal flatware that everyone uses, are no longer made in the United States. The last factory in an industry stretching back to colonial times closed eight months ago in Sherrill, N.Y., a small community in the foothills of the Adirondacks, and 80 employees lost their jobs.
02/16/11

To put Americans back to work, the federal government must change tax policies and create incentives for companies to build new factories in America instead of Asia, according to Paul Otellini, CEO of Intel Corp, the computer chip maker.

02/15/11
The expiration of a program that supports those left jobless by trade pacts threatens to fracture the coalition of lawmakers backing trade accords with South Korea, Colombia and Panama, according to The Wall Street Journal
02/15/11
Outsourcing by U.S. technology companies is on the decline, according to a survey by BDO USA, the accounting and consulting organization. About 35 percent of the one-hundred chief financial officers (CFOs) of the companies surveyed indicated that their firms are currently outsourcing services or manufacturing outside the U.S. -- down from a high of 62 percent in 2009, and a slight decline from the 37 percent decline in 2010.
02/15/11
The rise of the high-speed Internet, a bought-and-paid-for U.S. government and million-dollar executive pay that is not performance related are permitting greedy and disloyal corporate executives, Wall Street and large retailers to dismantle the ladders of upward mobility that made America an "opportunity society."
02/12/11
The U.S. trade deficit with China hit a record $273 billion in 2010. No wonder – China does everything it can to keep American goods and services out even as it floods the US with job-killing imports. It hits American steel with an import tax, and a Chinese state-owned company that processes electronic payments for credit cards has a virtual monopoly, shutting out a US supplier. The Obama Administration is taking its case to the World Trade Organization after talks with Beijing went nowhere. Good luck there.
02/10/11
If the job-killing Korea free trade agreement, the largest since NAFTA, isn’t stopped, the Obama Administration will try to push more through Congress. US Trade Representative Ron Kirk says the Administration will send the Korea trade deal to Capitol Hill “within weeks” and will “immediately intensify” talks with Colombia and Panama to finalize trade pacts with those countries.
02/10/11
The most liberal member of the Senate, Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont fired off a letter to the director of the Smithsonian Museum furious over statues of the President’s in the museum gift shop - made in China. "As a nation, we have all got to be aware that one of the major reasons that the unemployment rate in this country is so high is because it is increasingly difficult to find products in our nation's stores that are manufactured in this country,” wrote Sanders. The independent senator began his political career registered as a Socialist.
02/09/11
The outsourcing of U.S. manufacturing to foreign nations has become a national security issue for the U.S. intelligence community. Top Spy Probes Outsourcing of U.S. Manufacturing. The Director for National Intelligence – the nation’s top spy - is so concerned over loss of domestic capability and dependence on foreign nations for key high-tech materials, components and systems that the intel chief is undertaking a probe of the state of American manufacturing.

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