Updates

09/20/11
Mary Orndorff, The Birmingham News A trade deal that would remove the tariff on foreign-made sleeping bags moved closer to becoming law Monday night, jeopardizing a Haleyville manufacturer who has lobbied hard for two years to protect his product from an onslaught of cheaper imports.
09/20/11
Erin Ailworth, The Boston Globe Lithium-ion battery maker Boston-Power Inc. plans to cut about 30 jobs in Massachusetts as it expands in China, where the Westborough company is receiving $125 million in private equity and government support to build batteries for electric vehicles.
09/20/11
David D’Alessandro, The Boston Globe Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s answer to 12.5 million people unemployed at the height of the Great Depression was the New Deal. Replete with bold, creative, and practical ideas, the New Deal marked the beginning of people getting back to work and America recovering.
09/20/11
George Zornick, The Nation When Kathy Hochul won the special election in New York’s 26th district in May, just about everyone who follows politics could tell you her stance on Paul Ryan’s budget: she was against it.
09/19/11

Alan Tonelson, Bloomberg President Barack Obama’s new jobs plan, if passed by Congress, might spark some activity and even some employment in the moribund U.S. economy. But it’s unlikely to foster the growth and job creation we urgently need, without adding new debt, because the plan ignores a key obstacle to genuine prosperity: the nation’s immense trade deficit.

09/19/11
Aaron Krager, Progress Illinois Trade talks for a Trans-Pacific Free Trade Agreement ended yesterday at the Hilton Hotel in the world’s fourth most economically powerful city in the world. It seems only fitting Chicago, a city with nearly a half a trillion dollars in economic output, played host to the eighth round of negotiations between nine Pacific countries.
09/19/11
James W. Chesnutt, Sun Journal Our country needs trade and we need export markets for our USA-manufactured goods. What we do NOT need is to open another back door for China to take away more American jobs. Unfortunately, that is what the proposed free trade agreement with South Korea does. If you look at the facts, this pact is closer to a free trade agreement with China than anything else. Consider that only 35 percent of any industrial or commercial product has to be made in Korea or the U.S. to get duty-free FTA status. That means that 65 percent can be made elsewhere and that really means it will be made in China or even worse North Korea.
09/19/11
Lynn M. Kempen Ozark, News-Leader.com Billy Long's veneration of Ronald Reagan (per his opinion published Sept. 11) is quite a stretch of the facts. Sadly, many self-professing conservatives seem to have this same [failure of memory] regarding President Reagan's legacy.
09/19/11
Vicki Needham, The Hill President Obama’s push for renewed assistance for workers who lose their jobs due to trade isn’t diminishing organized labor’s opposition to the three trade deals he wants Congress to approve.
09/19/11

John Stanton, Roll Call Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) has enlisted the aid of an anti-free-trade group in his quixotic campaign to provide protections for an Alabama sleeping bag maker as part of a looming trade bill.

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