Updates

06/29/11
David Sirota, Salon.com Trade policy, as I've previously noted, often has nothing to do with what we conventionally define as "trade" -- that is, it has nothing to do with the exchange of goods and services, and everything to do with using state power to solidify corporations' supremacy over individual citizens. In that sense, the modern era's ongoing debates over "free trade" are a corporate public relations coup -- by tricking the public and the media into believing we're debating one thing (commerce) when we're debating something entirely different (power), the "free trade" brand casts those who raise questions about these pacts as know-nothing Luddites (who could be against commerce, right?).
06/29/11
Matthew Continetti, The Washington Post As a follower of Columbia University economist Jagdish Bhagwati, I was happy to read that a deal may soon be reached on three stalled free trade pacts. Closer look at the reporting, though, suggests the passage of the Colombia, Korea, and Panama free trade agreements may be far off. Which stands to reason. These days, free trade isn’t a winning issue — it’s a political liability.
06/29/11
RT There will be quite a few new not-so-happy faces joining the 24 million-plus unemployed Americans soon enough when Goldman Sachs, one of the largest financial institutions in the country, will lay off a large chunk of their domestic employees.
06/28/11
Geoffrey James, CBS Business Network The business case for outsourcing abroad is simple: a lower cost of goods allows your company make higher profit margins while remaining competitive against other firms. It can also reduce taxes and help you position your firm to expand sales inside the countries where you’re deployed.
06/28/11
Thomas Gibson, The News Journal Since the United States entered into the North American Free Trade Agreement and the World Trade Organization in the 1990s, more than 42,000 factories have been closed.
06/28/11
Jenni Vincent, The Journal MARTINSBURG - United Auto Workers representatives Jim Rogers and Kevin Collinson joined several other local business representatives at the United States District Court Monday morning, watching via satellite as U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller brought a Senate Commerce Committee hearing - complete with witnesses - to Charleston.
06/28/11
Sen. Fritz Hollings, Huffington Post Globalization is nothing more than a trade war with production looking for a country cheaper to produce. Our principal competitor, China, subsidizes its production, controls its market, requires foreign investment to surrender technology, and uses every trick in the book. It takes an industrial policy to compete in globalization. Talking of free trade is ridiculous. We have an industrial policy in our trade laws but don't enforce them. We wouldn't be begging Russia for helicopters for Afghanistan if we enforced the War Production Act of 1950 like Jack Kennedy did in 1961. Imposing an import surcharge like Richard Nixon imposed in 1971, when our trade deficit was a miniscule of our trade deficit today, would immediately create jobs and growth. Ronald Reagan obtained restraint agreements on steel, motor vehicles, computers, and machine tools, and imposed a 45% tariff on motorcycle imports to save Harley-Davidson. Enforcing our trade laws would create millions of jobs. The press never mentions this.
06/28/11
John Schneider, Lansing State Journal GRAND LEDGE - Yes, we all accept the reality of a global economy, in which everything comes from everywhere. But some of it seems to defy common sense.
06/28/11
Curtis W. Ellis and Marilynn Momber, Northern Express Pending free trade agreements with Korea, Colombia and Panama are bad for Michigan farmers and must be rejected if we are to preserve our way of life.
06/27/11
David Barboza, The New York Times SHANGHAI — Talk about outsourcing. At a sprawling manufacturing complex here, hundreds of Chinese laborers are now completing work on the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.

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