Updates

07/06/11
Curtis W. Ellis and Joaquin Contente, Redding Record Searchlight Pending free trade agreements with Korea, Colombia and Panama are bad for California farmers and must be rejected if we are to preserve our way of life.
07/05/11
Robert Pore, The Grand Island Independent At the Export 2011 Trade Seminar in Grand Island last Wednesday, speakers touted the benefits of pending free trade agreements with Panama, Columbia and South Korea as helping Nebraska agriculture. That view is supported by major agricultural groups, such as the National Corn Growers Association. However, the Coalition for a Prosperous America is on the opposite end of the spectrum, seeing a misguided trade course.
07/05/11
Daily Kos "Free trade" is important to Republicans. It's one of those things that they rally around, and one of the few things that Republicans and Democrats have managed to keep passing no matter how frosty relations between the two parties might become.
07/05/11
Office of U.S. Rep. Mike Michaud WASHINGTON, DC – Today, Representative Mike Michaud (D-ME), Chairman of the House Trade Working Group, applauded a ruling of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which found that China’s export restraints on critical raw materials used in manufacturing violate global trade rules.
07/05/11
PoliticalNews.me WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Olympia J. Snowe (R-Maine), a senior member of the Senate Finance Committee, says the pending U.S.–South Korea Free Trade Agreement (FTA) could endanger critical manufacturing jobs and thus will withhold her support until the U.S. government demonstrates its commitment to enforcing existing trade rules and holding violators accountable.
06/30/11
Doug Palmer, Reuters (Reuters) - President Barack Obama's plan to win approval of U.S. free trade deals with South Korea, Colombia and Panama faces its first test on Thursday as the Senate Finance Committee takes up the measures.
06/30/11
Howard Richman, Richmans' Trade and Taxes Blog With growing trade deficits preventing the U.S. economic recovery, how could Congress and the President leave balancing trade clauses out from new trade agreements? Have they learned nothing?
06/29/11
David Sirota, Salon.com Trade policy, as I've previously noted, often has nothing to do with what we conventionally define as "trade" -- that is, it has nothing to do with the exchange of goods and services, and everything to do with using state power to solidify corporations' supremacy over individual citizens. In that sense, the modern era's ongoing debates over "free trade" are a corporate public relations coup -- by tricking the public and the media into believing we're debating one thing (commerce) when we're debating something entirely different (power), the "free trade" brand casts those who raise questions about these pacts as know-nothing Luddites (who could be against commerce, right?).
06/29/11
Matthew Continetti, The Washington Post As a follower of Columbia University economist Jagdish Bhagwati, I was happy to read that a deal may soon be reached on three stalled free trade pacts. Closer look at the reporting, though, suggests the passage of the Colombia, Korea, and Panama free trade agreements may be far off. Which stands to reason. These days, free trade isn’t a winning issue — it’s a political liability.
06/29/11
RT There will be quite a few new not-so-happy faces joining the 24 million-plus unemployed Americans soon enough when Goldman Sachs, one of the largest financial institutions in the country, will lay off a large chunk of their domestic employees.

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