Updates

07/12/11
Kate Ackley and David M. Drucker, Roll Call If it weren’t for one nagging issue, the fight over three pending free-trade agreements would be the debate of the summer.
07/12/11
Leo Hindery Jr., The Huffington Post The number of American workers and friends of labor who, for all the right factual reasons, continue to stand against the three pending Free Trade Agreements (or FTAs) with South Korea, Panama and Colombia are legion. Many just aren't as public as the likes of Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH); Tom Buffenbarger, President of the Machinists and Aerospace Workers Union; Senator Bob Casey (D-PA), and Leo Gerard, President of the Steelworkers Union, who've been leading the fights against these FTAs.
07/11/11
Randal C. Archibold, The New York Times When the latest bloody headlines from the drug war in Mexico reach headquarters in New York, Ken Chandler, the manager of an American electronics manufacturing plant here, jumps on the phone.
07/11/11
Mike Evangelist and Christine Owens, The Hill Last week, Senate and House finance leaders finally hashed out a deal on a long-delayed trade pact with South Korea that included an agreement to reauthorize Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), which provides job training and income support to U.S. workers laid off due to trade. It was a rare opportunity to act on legislation with bipartisan support and the broad backing of voters, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and worker advocates.
07/11/11
Denise Allabaugh, The Times-Tribune U.S. Sen. Bob Casey toured speciality glass manufacturer Schott Glass Technologies on Friday and stressed the need to crack down on unfair trade practices and create a manufacturing strategy that helps Pennsylvania businesses create jobs.
07/11/11
Tim Burga, Dispatch Politics For over a decade, the labor movement and development advocates have called for fair-trade policy that is part of a more coordinated and coherent national economic strategy. Unfortunately, the Korean, Colombian and Panamanian free-trade deals before Congress do not address the fundamental policy failures of the North American Free Trade Agreement and China's inclusion into "favored nation status," which has led to catastrophic job loss in the U.S. and the explosion of our import/export deficit, now reaching $500 billion annually.
07/10/11
Howard Richman, Raymond Richman, and Jesse Richman, American Thinker The first presidential report to Congress on manufacturing, Alexander Hamilton's 1791 Report on Manufactures, was a classic; it shaped American industrial policy for 150 years. The latest report, the Report to the President on Ensuring American Leadership in Advanced Manufacturing published last month by the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), shares many similarities. Both reports recognize that manufacturing leads to economic strength and to innovations. Hamilton recommended tariffs; the latest report recommends new incarnations of President Reagan's successful SEMATECH consortium as well as a cut in the corporate income tax. Although it represents a step in the right direction, the new report does not go far enough.
07/10/11
Steven J. D'Amico, The Boston Globe LONG BEFORE 2008, when Wall Street’s unchecked greed brought the world’s economy to its knees, we in the middle class could feel our future slipping away. We knew that we were working longer and harder - we could see that even with two salaries, most families had less disposable income than families did in the 1960s and ’70s when one income was the norm. We knew that good quality jobs were harder to find and hold. And we knew that a big reason we were falling behind was a flawed trade policy that shipped many of our jobs overseas.
07/08/11
Office of Rep. Mike Michaud WASHINGTON, DC – Today, Representative Mike Michaud (D-ME), Chairman of the House Trade Working Group, issued the following statement on the House Ways & Means Committee and the Senate Finance Committee mock markups of the free trade agreements with Korea, Colombia, and Panama: “Today’s action unfortunately signals that Washington is one step closer to passing more free trade deals that the American people don’t want. These trade agreements were negotiated inside the beltway for the benefit of giant multinational corporations at the expense of American workers.
07/08/11
Eric Martin and Bill McQuillen, Bloomberg The Senate Finance Committee backed legislation for a free-trade agreement with South Korea without support from Republicans, who object to using the accord to renew aid for workers who lose their jobs to global competition.

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